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ETHNICITY: Indian

"I get a lot of different things. I get Latin American more than I get Indian for sure. People say Egyptian, which I don’t get. I don’t know, I get like a huge variety because I guess I’m ethnically ambiguous."

"The other day, I was talking about how people typecast every single race. Like, 'Oh, you don’t look like an Indian person,' or, 'Oh, I’m not usually into Indian people, but you’re different.' By saying that, you’re assuming that every single person in that race looks and acts the same. It’s shitty because you’re just going off of concepts presented to you by media, stereotypes, and also like your very small interactions with people from that race."

"The fact that people think stereotypes and can associate various qualities with various races means race has been turned into a social construct."

"I see a future where race matters less. I feel like we’re moving towards a society, with the impact of globalism and the progression of societal values, where multiracialism is becoming much bigger, so I think identity in that case, is really diluted, and it matters less."

"I think it’s so dependent on how you present yourself. Someone can be a quarter black, but if you’re seen as black, then you're black. I think it really depends on genetics and how far we progress in multiracialism to see if race won’t exist because I think race will always exist, but it won’t be how we see it today. Rather than 'I’m an Indian woman' or 'I’m a black woman' it’s 'I’m a multiracial person, and what does that mean for me.'"

"Coming from a school in Alabama that was very white, Duke was diverse but also confronted its racial problems in a more violent and aggressive way. My school in Birmingham didn’t have the noose incident. People would be very racist, but they wouldn’t be violently so, and there weren’t these huge acts of aggression towards people of color. So I think I experienced a lot of anger initially just about being a person of color in general at Duke."

"I think at the same time, you do learn to find solidarity with other people of color. It’s made me strengthen my connections with other people of color in that you can relate to them in these ways and you can talk about things in that way and so in that way it’s very comforting."